Calm Your Mind Daily Mood Tracker Journal - Printable Book

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Inside Page
Calm Your Mind - Daily Mood Tracker Journal Abstract Green Pastel
Calm Your Mind - Daily Mood Tracker Journal Black White Green
Inside Page
Calm Your Mind - Daily Mood Tracker Journal Black White Green
Calm Your Mind - Daily Mood Tracker Journal Ethnic Tribal Green
Inside Page
Calm Your Mind - Daily Mood Tracker Journal Ethnic Tribal Green
Calm Your Mind - Daily Mood Tracker Journal Luxury Green Delicate
Inside Page
Calm Your Mind - Daily Mood Tracker Journal Luxury Green Delicate
Calm Your Mind - Daily Mood Tracker Journal Marble Green White
Inside Page
Calm Your Mind - Daily Mood Tracker Journal Marble Green White
Calm Your Mind - Daily Mood Tracker Journal Polka Dot Green
Inside Page
Calm Your Mind - Daily Mood Tracker Journal Polka Dot Green
Details

Description:


  • Page size: 8.5 inches wide x 11 inches long

  • File type: I pdf book

  • Page number: 104 pages.

Your instant digital downloadable file will become available for you to download once your purchase has been confirmed.


Sorry, we don't accept cancellations, exchanges and returns because this is a digital download file. All sales are considered final and non-refundable because of the nature of the file.

Since it's a digital file, nothing will be shipped to you. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us before purchase.


This printable file can be printed and put together based on your needs and wants. You buy it once but you can print the pages as many times you like.


You can print the file at home, work, printer shop, retail store, UPS, Walmart, Costo-co, Online printer, Walgreens, CVS, Canva etc.

The files are high resolution and of great quality.


Sometimes the color of the final print out can vary and differ from monitor to monitor and printer to printer. So please keep in mind that final print quality depends on the type of printer, computer and paper used for printing.


For the best results, please use a great printer and choose high quality paper.


Write in your daily mood tracker everyday to develop a consistency so that you can understand your habits and have better insights into your patterns.


The daily mood tracker journal is functional, stylish and great for recording your habits. It's designed to help you stay organized so you feel empowered while finding balance, focus and peace so you can achieve your goals and mission.


The daily mood tracker journal has a beautiful colored interior and various sections that you can fill out documenting your habits.


Get an insight into you daily habits, moods, and emotions with the daily mood tracker. Improve your mental health, peace of mind, manage your stress and reduce anxiety.


Sometimes our days can be overwhelming with so much to do or get done so we can stay productive and fruitful. A daily planner journal helps to improve your effectiveness, efficiency and ability to produce great results.


If you are not using the journal for yourself, you can give it as a gift to a loved one, friend, family member, colleague, co-worker, charity organization etc and bless someone else and help them stay organized and in control of their life and things.


The journal is ideal for both men and women and can be used by adults of all ages. It can be used for both personal or business purposes.


Inside:

  • Date:

  • Time:

  • Mood:

  • Notes


An Inside page with a list of common moods and emotions.


  • Admiration

  • Adoration

  • Aesthetic

  • Amusement

  • Anger

  • Annoyed

  • Anticipation

  • Anxious

  • Appreciation

  • Aversion

  • Awe

  • Awkwardness

  • Bitter

  • Boredom

  • Calmness

  • Cheated

  • Compassion

  • Confused

  • Contentment

  • Contrary

  • Craving

  • Desperate

  • Disappointed

  • Disapproving

  • Disgust

  • Dislike

  • Disturbed

  • Doubtful

  • Empathetic

  • Enjoyment

  • Entrancement

  • Envy

  • Excitement

  • Fear

  • Friendship

  • Frustrated

  • Gloomy

  • Grieved

  • Happiness

  • Heartbroken

  • Hopeless

  • Horrified

  • Indignation

  • Infuriated

  • Insulted

  • Interest

  • Irritated

  • Joy

  • Kindness

  • Loathing

  • Lonely

  • Lost

  • Love

  • Mad

  • Miserable

  • Nauseated

  • Nervous

  • Nostalgia

  • Offended

  • Pain

  • Panicked

  • Peace

  • Peeved

  • Pity

  • Pride

  • Relief

  • Resigned

  • Revulsion

  • Romance

  • Sadness

  • Satisfaction

  • Sexual Desire

  • Shame

  • Stressed

  • Surprise

  • Terrified

  • Troubled

  • Trust

  • Uncomfortable

  • Unhappy

  • Vengeful

  • Withdrawn

  • Worried



Wikipedia:


Mood (psychology)


In psychology, a mood is an affective state. In contrast to emotions or feelings, moods are less specific, less intense and less likely to be provoked or instantiated by a particular stimulus or event. Moods are typically described as having either a positive or negative valence. In other words, people usually talk about being in a good mood or a bad mood.

Mood also differs from temperament or personality traits which are even longer-lasting. Nevertheless, personality traits such as optimism and neuroticism predispose certain types of moods. Long term disturbances of mood such as clinical depression and bipolar disorder are considered mood disorders. Mood is an internal, subjective state but it often can be inferred from posture and other behaviors. "We can be sent into a mood by an unexpected event, from the happiness of seeing an old friend to the anger of discovering betrayal by a partner. We may also just fall into a mood."

Research also shows that a person's mood can influence how they process advertising. Mood has been found to interact with gender to affect consumer processing of information.



Emotion


Emotions are biological states associated with the nervous system[1][2][3] brought on by neurophysiological changes variously associated with thoughts, feelings, behavioural responses, and a degree of pleasure or displeasure.[4][5] There is currently no scientific consensus on a definition. Emotions are often intertwined with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, creativity,[6] and motivation.[7]

Research on emotion has increased significantly over the past two decades with many fields contributing including psychology, neuroscience, affective neuroscience, endocrinology, medicine, history, sociology of emotions, and computer science. The numerous theories that attempt to explain the origin, neurobiology, experience, and function of emotions have only fostered more intense research on this topic. Current areas of research in the concept of emotion include the development of materials that stimulate and elicit emotion. In addition, PET scans and fMRI scans help study the affective picture processes in the brain.




Emotion classification


Emotion classification, the means by which one may distinguish or contrast one emotion from another, is a contested issue in emotion research and in affective science. Researchers have approached the classification of emotions from one of two fundamental viewpoints:

  1. that emotions are discrete and fundamentally different constructs

  2. that emotions can be characterized on a dimensional basis in groupings


Mood Tracking


Mood tracking is a positive psychology technique for improving mental health where a person records their mood, usually at set time intervals, in order to help identify patterns in how their mood varies. It has been suggested as a self-help method for people suffering from mood disorders such as anxiety, clinical depression, and bipolar disorder.




Mood Swing


A mood swing is an extreme or rapid change in mood. Such mood swings can play a positive part in promoting problem solving and in producing flexible forward planning. However, when mood swings are so strong that they are disruptive, they may be the main part of a bipolar disorder.



Metamood


Meta-mood is a term used by psychologists to refer to an individual's awareness of their emotions.[1] The term was first utilized by John D. Mayer and Peter Salovey who believed the experience of mood involved "direct" and "indirect" components.[2] While the direct level refers to the simple appearance of mood - happiness, fear, anger, sadness, and surprise (often referred to as the six basic emotions, introduced by Paul Ekman),[3] the indirect level, or the meta-mood experience, does not solely consist of the emotions experienced by an individual in the moment. Rather, it is a reflective state which involves additional thoughts and feelings about the mood itself.[2] "I shouldn’t feel this way" or "I am thinking of ways to improve my mood" are examples of reflective thoughts during a meta-mood experience.[4]

Meta-mood is also a facet of emotional intelligence. Alexithymia, or the inability to identify and describe one's own or others' emotions, is generally viewed as antagonistic to meta-mood, as individuals who have symptoms of alexithymia often have trouble describing and analyzing their emotions. People who are unreflective and emotionally stable have fewer meta-mood experiences and commonly do not need them.[3] On the other hand, individuals who are generally self-aware and have high emotionality have highly developed meta-mood experiences. Studies have shown that individuals who are able to improve negative moods through meta-emotions are seen to possess healthier personalities than individuals who are not able to have such experiences.[3]



Journal Therapy


Journal therapy is a writing therapy focusing on the writer's internal experiences, thoughts and feelings. This kind of therapy uses reflective writing enabling the writer to gain mental and emotional clarity, validate experiences and come to a deeper understanding of him/herself. Journal therapy can also be used to express difficult material or access previously inaccessible materials.

Like other forms of therapy, journal therapy can be used to heal a writer's emotional or physical problems or work through a trauma, such as an illness, addiction, or relationship problems, among others.[1] Journal therapy can supplement an on-going therapy, or can take place in group therapy or self-directed therapy.



Quantified Self


The quantified self refers both to the cultural phenomenon of self-tracking with technology and to a community of users and makers of self-tracking tools who share an interest in “self-knowledge through numbers.”[1] Quantified Self practices overlap with the practice of lifelogging and other trends that incorporate technology and data acquisition into daily life, often with the goal of improving physical, mental, and/or emotional performance. The widespread adoption in recent years of wearable fitness and sleep trackers such as the Fitbit or the Apple Watch[2], combined with the increased presence of Internet of Things in healthcare and in exercise equipment, have made self-tracking accessible to a large segment of the population.



Depression (Mood)


Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity.[1] It can affect a person's thoughts, behavior, motivation, feelings, and sense of well-being. [2] The core symptom of depression is said to be anhedonia, which refers to loss of interest or a loss of feeling of pleasure in certain activities that usually bring joy to people.[3] Depressed mood is a symptom of some mood disorders such as major depressive disorder or dysthymia;[4] it is a normal temporary reaction to life events, such as the loss of a loved one; and it is also a symptom of some physical diseases and a side effect of some drugs and medical treatments.

Details

Description:


  • Page size: 8.5 inches wide x 11 inches long

  • File type: I pdf book

  • Page number: 104 pages.

Your instant digital downloadable file will become available for you to download once your purchase has been confirmed.


Sorry, we don't accept cancellations, exchanges and returns because this is a digital download file. All sales are considered final and non-refundable because of the nature of the file.

Since it's a digital file, nothing will be shipped to you. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us before purchase.


This printable file can be printed and put together based on your needs and wants. You buy it once but you can print the pages as many times you like.


You can print the file at home, work, printer shop, retail store, UPS, Walmart, Costo-co, Online printer, Walgreens, CVS, Canva etc.

The files are high resolution and of great quality.


Sometimes the color of the final print out can vary and differ from monitor to monitor and printer to printer. So please keep in mind that final print quality depends on the type of printer, computer and paper used for printing.


For the best results, please use a great printer and choose high quality paper.


Write in your daily mood tracker everyday to develop a consistency so that you can understand your habits and have better insights into your patterns.


The daily mood tracker journal is functional, stylish and great for recording your habits. It's designed to help you stay organized so you feel empowered while finding balance, focus and peace so you can achieve your goals and mission.


The daily mood tracker journal has a beautiful colored interior and various sections that you can fill out documenting your habits.


Get an insight into you daily habits, moods, and emotions with the daily mood tracker. Improve your mental health, peace of mind, manage your stress and reduce anxiety.


Sometimes our days can be overwhelming with so much to do or get done so we can stay productive and fruitful. A daily planner journal helps to improve your effectiveness, efficiency and ability to produce great results.


If you are not using the journal for yourself, you can give it as a gift to a loved one, friend, family member, colleague, co-worker, charity organization etc and bless someone else and help them stay organized and in control of their life and things.


The journal is ideal for both men and women and can be used by adults of all ages. It can be used for both personal or business purposes.


Inside:

  • Date:

  • Time:

  • Mood:

  • Notes


An Inside page with a list of common moods and emotions.


  • Admiration

  • Adoration

  • Aesthetic

  • Amusement

  • Anger

  • Annoyed

  • Anticipation

  • Anxious

  • Appreciation

  • Aversion

  • Awe

  • Awkwardness

  • Bitter

  • Boredom

  • Calmness

  • Cheated

  • Compassion

  • Confused

  • Contentment

  • Contrary

  • Craving

  • Desperate

  • Disappointed

  • Disapproving

  • Disgust

  • Dislike

  • Disturbed

  • Doubtful

  • Empathetic

  • Enjoyment

  • Entrancement

  • Envy

  • Excitement

  • Fear

  • Friendship

  • Frustrated

  • Gloomy

  • Grieved

  • Happiness

  • Heartbroken

  • Hopeless

  • Horrified

  • Indignation

  • Infuriated

  • Insulted

  • Interest

  • Irritated

  • Joy

  • Kindness

  • Loathing

  • Lonely

  • Lost

  • Love

  • Mad

  • Miserable

  • Nauseated

  • Nervous

  • Nostalgia

  • Offended

  • Pain

  • Panicked

  • Peace

  • Peeved

  • Pity

  • Pride

  • Relief

  • Resigned

  • Revulsion

  • Romance

  • Sadness

  • Satisfaction

  • Sexual Desire

  • Shame

  • Stressed

  • Surprise

  • Terrified

  • Troubled

  • Trust

  • Uncomfortable

  • Unhappy

  • Vengeful

  • Withdrawn

  • Worried



Wikipedia:


Mood (psychology)


In psychology, a mood is an affective state. In contrast to emotions or feelings, moods are less specific, less intense and less likely to be provoked or instantiated by a particular stimulus or event. Moods are typically described as having either a positive or negative valence. In other words, people usually talk about being in a good mood or a bad mood.

Mood also differs from temperament or personality traits which are even longer-lasting. Nevertheless, personality traits such as optimism and neuroticism predispose certain types of moods. Long term disturbances of mood such as clinical depression and bipolar disorder are considered mood disorders. Mood is an internal, subjective state but it often can be inferred from posture and other behaviors. "We can be sent into a mood by an unexpected event, from the happiness of seeing an old friend to the anger of discovering betrayal by a partner. We may also just fall into a mood."

Research also shows that a person's mood can influence how they process advertising. Mood has been found to interact with gender to affect consumer processing of information.



Emotion


Emotions are biological states associated with the nervous system[1][2][3] brought on by neurophysiological changes variously associated with thoughts, feelings, behavioural responses, and a degree of pleasure or displeasure.[4][5] There is currently no scientific consensus on a definition. Emotions are often intertwined with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, creativity,[6] and motivation.[7]

Research on emotion has increased significantly over the past two decades with many fields contributing including psychology, neuroscience, affective neuroscience, endocrinology, medicine, history, sociology of emotions, and computer science. The numerous theories that attempt to explain the origin, neurobiology, experience, and function of emotions have only fostered more intense research on this topic. Current areas of research in the concept of emotion include the development of materials that stimulate and elicit emotion. In addition, PET scans and fMRI scans help study the affective picture processes in the brain.




Emotion classification


Emotion classification, the means by which one may distinguish or contrast one emotion from another, is a contested issue in emotion research and in affective science. Researchers have approached the classification of emotions from one of two fundamental viewpoints:

  1. that emotions are discrete and fundamentally different constructs

  2. that emotions can be characterized on a dimensional basis in groupings


Mood Tracking


Mood tracking is a positive psychology technique for improving mental health where a person records their mood, usually at set time intervals, in order to help identify patterns in how their mood varies. It has been suggested as a self-help method for people suffering from mood disorders such as anxiety, clinical depression, and bipolar disorder.




Mood Swing


A mood swing is an extreme or rapid change in mood. Such mood swings can play a positive part in promoting problem solving and in producing flexible forward planning. However, when mood swings are so strong that they are disruptive, they may be the main part of a bipolar disorder.



Metamood


Meta-mood is a term used by psychologists to refer to an individual's awareness of their emotions.[1] The term was first utilized by John D. Mayer and Peter Salovey who believed the experience of mood involved "direct" and "indirect" components.[2] While the direct level refers to the simple appearance of mood - happiness, fear, anger, sadness, and surprise (often referred to as the six basic emotions, introduced by Paul Ekman),[3] the indirect level, or the meta-mood experience, does not solely consist of the emotions experienced by an individual in the moment. Rather, it is a reflective state which involves additional thoughts and feelings about the mood itself.[2] "I shouldn’t feel this way" or "I am thinking of ways to improve my mood" are examples of reflective thoughts during a meta-mood experience.[4]

Meta-mood is also a facet of emotional intelligence. Alexithymia, or the inability to identify and describe one's own or others' emotions, is generally viewed as antagonistic to meta-mood, as individuals who have symptoms of alexithymia often have trouble describing and analyzing their emotions. People who are unreflective and emotionally stable have fewer meta-mood experiences and commonly do not need them.[3] On the other hand, individuals who are generally self-aware and have high emotionality have highly developed meta-mood experiences. Studies have shown that individuals who are able to improve negative moods through meta-emotions are seen to possess healthier personalities than individuals who are not able to have such experiences.[3]



Journal Therapy


Journal therapy is a writing therapy focusing on the writer's internal experiences, thoughts and feelings. This kind of therapy uses reflective writing enabling the writer to gain mental and emotional clarity, validate experiences and come to a deeper understanding of him/herself. Journal therapy can also be used to express difficult material or access previously inaccessible materials.

Like other forms of therapy, journal therapy can be used to heal a writer's emotional or physical problems or work through a trauma, such as an illness, addiction, or relationship problems, among others.[1] Journal therapy can supplement an on-going therapy, or can take place in group therapy or self-directed therapy.



Quantified Self


The quantified self refers both to the cultural phenomenon of self-tracking with technology and to a community of users and makers of self-tracking tools who share an interest in “self-knowledge through numbers.”[1] Quantified Self practices overlap with the practice of lifelogging and other trends that incorporate technology and data acquisition into daily life, often with the goal of improving physical, mental, and/or emotional performance. The widespread adoption in recent years of wearable fitness and sleep trackers such as the Fitbit or the Apple Watch[2], combined with the increased presence of Internet of Things in healthcare and in exercise equipment, have made self-tracking accessible to a large segment of the population.



Depression (Mood)


Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity.[1] It can affect a person's thoughts, behavior, motivation, feelings, and sense of well-being. [2] The core symptom of depression is said to be anhedonia, which refers to loss of interest or a loss of feeling of pleasure in certain activities that usually bring joy to people.[3] Depressed mood is a symptom of some mood disorders such as major depressive disorder or dysthymia;[4] it is a normal temporary reaction to life events, such as the loss of a loved one; and it is also a symptom of some physical diseases and a side effect of some drugs and medical treatments.

Details

Description:


  • Page size: 8.5 inches wide x 11 inches long

  • File type: I pdf book

  • Page number: 104 pages.

Your instant digital downloadable file will become available for you to download once your purchase has been confirmed.


Sorry, we don't accept cancellations, exchanges and returns because this is a digital download file. All sales are considered final and non-refundable because of the nature of the file.

Since it's a digital file, nothing will be shipped to you. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us before purchase.


This printable file can be printed and put together based on your needs and wants. You buy it once but you can print the pages as many times you like.


You can print the file at home, work, printer shop, retail store, UPS, Walmart, Costo-co, Online printer, Walgreens, CVS, Canva etc.

The files are high resolution and of great quality.


Sometimes the color of the final print out can vary and differ from monitor to monitor and printer to printer. So please keep in mind that final print quality depends on the type of printer, computer and paper used for printing.


For the best results, please use a great printer and choose high quality paper.


Write in your daily mood tracker everyday to develop a consistency so that you can understand your habits and have better insights into your patterns.


The daily mood tracker journal is functional, stylish and great for recording your habits. It's designed to help you stay organized so you feel empowered while finding balance, focus and peace so you can achieve your goals and mission.


The daily mood tracker journal has a beautiful colored interior and various sections that you can fill out documenting your habits.


Get an insight into you daily habits, moods, and emotions with the daily mood tracker. Improve your mental health, peace of mind, manage your stress and reduce anxiety.


Sometimes our days can be overwhelming with so much to do or get done so we can stay productive and fruitful. A daily planner journal helps to improve your effectiveness, efficiency and ability to produce great results.


If you are not using the journal for yourself, you can give it as a gift to a loved one, friend, family member, colleague, co-worker, charity organization etc and bless someone else and help them stay organized and in control of their life and things.


The journal is ideal for both men and women and can be used by adults of all ages. It can be used for both personal or business purposes.


Inside:

  • Date:

  • Time:

  • Mood:

  • Notes


An Inside page with a list of common moods and emotions.


  • Admiration

  • Adoration

  • Aesthetic

  • Amusement

  • Anger

  • Annoyed

  • Anticipation

  • Anxious

  • Appreciation

  • Aversion

  • Awe

  • Awkwardness

  • Bitter

  • Boredom

  • Calmness

  • Cheated

  • Compassion

  • Confused

  • Contentment

  • Contrary

  • Craving

  • Desperate

  • Disappointed

  • Disapproving

  • Disgust

  • Dislike

  • Disturbed

  • Doubtful

  • Empathetic

  • Enjoyment

  • Entrancement

  • Envy

  • Excitement

  • Fear

  • Friendship

  • Frustrated

  • Gloomy

  • Grieved

  • Happiness

  • Heartbroken

  • Hopeless

  • Horrified

  • Indignation

  • Infuriated

  • Insulted

  • Interest

  • Irritated

  • Joy

  • Kindness

  • Loathing

  • Lonely

  • Lost

  • Love

  • Mad

  • Miserable

  • Nauseated

  • Nervous

  • Nostalgia

  • Offended

  • Pain

  • Panicked

  • Peace

  • Peeved

  • Pity

  • Pride

  • Relief

  • Resigned

  • Revulsion

  • Romance

  • Sadness

  • Satisfaction

  • Sexual Desire

  • Shame

  • Stressed

  • Surprise

  • Terrified

  • Troubled

  • Trust

  • Uncomfortable

  • Unhappy

  • Vengeful

  • Withdrawn

  • Worried



Wikipedia:


Mood (psychology)


In psychology, a mood is an affective state. In contrast to emotions or feelings, moods are less specific, less intense and less likely to be provoked or instantiated by a particular stimulus or event. Moods are typically described as having either a positive or negative valence. In other words, people usually talk about being in a good mood or a bad mood.

Mood also differs from temperament or personality traits which are even longer-lasting. Nevertheless, personality traits such as optimism and neuroticism predispose certain types of moods. Long term disturbances of mood such as clinical depression and bipolar disorder are considered mood disorders. Mood is an internal, subjective state but it often can be inferred from posture and other behaviors. "We can be sent into a mood by an unexpected event, from the happiness of seeing an old friend to the anger of discovering betrayal by a partner. We may also just fall into a mood."

Research also shows that a person's mood can influence how they process advertising. Mood has been found to interact with gender to affect consumer processing of information.



Emotion


Emotions are biological states associated with the nervous system[1][2][3] brought on by neurophysiological changes variously associated with thoughts, feelings, behavioural responses, and a degree of pleasure or displeasure.[4][5] There is currently no scientific consensus on a definition. Emotions are often intertwined with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, creativity,[6] and motivation.[7]

Research on emotion has increased significantly over the past two decades with many fields contributing including psychology, neuroscience, affective neuroscience, endocrinology, medicine, history, sociology of emotions, and computer science. The numerous theories that attempt to explain the origin, neurobiology, experience, and function of emotions have only fostered more intense research on this topic. Current areas of research in the concept of emotion include the development of materials that stimulate and elicit emotion. In addition, PET scans and fMRI scans help study the affective picture processes in the brain.




Emotion classification


Emotion classification, the means by which one may distinguish or contrast one emotion from another, is a contested issue in emotion research and in affective science. Researchers have approached the classification of emotions from one of two fundamental viewpoints:

  1. that emotions are discrete and fundamentally different constructs

  2. that emotions can be characterized on a dimensional basis in groupings


Mood Tracking


Mood tracking is a positive psychology technique for improving mental health where a person records their mood, usually at set time intervals, in order to help identify patterns in how their mood varies. It has been suggested as a self-help method for people suffering from mood disorders such as anxiety, clinical depression, and bipolar disorder.




Mood Swing


A mood swing is an extreme or rapid change in mood. Such mood swings can play a positive part in promoting problem solving and in producing flexible forward planning. However, when mood swings are so strong that they are disruptive, they may be the main part of a bipolar disorder.



Metamood


Meta-mood is a term used by psychologists to refer to an individual's awareness of their emotions.[1] The term was first utilized by John D. Mayer and Peter Salovey who believed the experience of mood involved "direct" and "indirect" components.[2] While the direct level refers to the simple appearance of mood - happiness, fear, anger, sadness, and surprise (often referred to as the six basic emotions, introduced by Paul Ekman),[3] the indirect level, or the meta-mood experience, does not solely consist of the emotions experienced by an individual in the moment. Rather, it is a reflective state which involves additional thoughts and feelings about the mood itself.[2] "I shouldn’t feel this way" or "I am thinking of ways to improve my mood" are examples of reflective thoughts during a meta-mood experience.[4]

Meta-mood is also a facet of emotional intelligence. Alexithymia, or the inability to identify and describe one's own or others' emotions, is generally viewed as antagonistic to meta-mood, as individuals who have symptoms of alexithymia often have trouble describing and analyzing their emotions. People who are unreflective and emotionally stable have fewer meta-mood experiences and commonly do not need them.[3] On the other hand, individuals who are generally self-aware and have high emotionality have highly developed meta-mood experiences. Studies have shown that individuals who are able to improve negative moods through meta-emotions are seen to possess healthier personalities than individuals who are not able to have such experiences.[3]



Journal Therapy


Journal therapy is a writing therapy focusing on the writer's internal experiences, thoughts and feelings. This kind of therapy uses reflective writing enabling the writer to gain mental and emotional clarity, validate experiences and come to a deeper understanding of him/herself. Journal therapy can also be used to express difficult material or access previously inaccessible materials.

Like other forms of therapy, journal therapy can be used to heal a writer's emotional or physical problems or work through a trauma, such as an illness, addiction, or relationship problems, among others.[1] Journal therapy can supplement an on-going therapy, or can take place in group therapy or self-directed therapy.



Quantified Self


The quantified self refers both to the cultural phenomenon of self-tracking with technology and to a community of users and makers of self-tracking tools who share an interest in “self-knowledge through numbers.”[1] Quantified Self practices overlap with the practice of lifelogging and other trends that incorporate technology and data acquisition into daily life, often with the goal of improving physical, mental, and/or emotional performance. The widespread adoption in recent years of wearable fitness and sleep trackers such as the Fitbit or the Apple Watch[2], combined with the increased presence of Internet of Things in healthcare and in exercise equipment, have made self-tracking accessible to a large segment of the population.



Depression (Mood)


Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity.[1] It can affect a person's thoughts, behavior, motivation, feelings, and sense of well-being. [2] The core symptom of depression is said to be anhedonia, which refers to loss of interest or a loss of feeling of pleasure in certain activities that usually bring joy to people.[3] Depressed mood is a symptom of some mood disorders such as major depressive disorder or dysthymia;[4] it is a normal temporary reaction to life events, such as the loss of a loved one; and it is also a symptom of some physical diseases and a side effect of some drugs and medical treatments.

Details

Description:


  • Page size: 8.5 inches wide x 11 inches long

  • File type: I pdf book

  • Page number: 104 pages.

Your instant digital downloadable file will become available for you to download once your purchase has been confirmed.


Sorry, we don't accept cancellations, exchanges and returns because this is a digital download file. All sales are considered final and non-refundable because of the nature of the file.

Since it's a digital file, nothing will be shipped to you. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us before purchase.


This printable file can be printed and put together based on your needs and wants. You buy it once but you can print the pages as many times you like.


You can print the file at home, work, printer shop, retail store, UPS, Walmart, Costo-co, Online printer, Walgreens, CVS, Canva etc.

The files are high resolution and of great quality.


Sometimes the color of the final print out can vary and differ from monitor to monitor and printer to printer. So please keep in mind that final print quality depends on the type of printer, computer and paper used for printing.


For the best results, please use a great printer and choose high quality paper.


Write in your daily mood tracker everyday to develop a consistency so that you can understand your habits and have better insights into your patterns.


The daily mood tracker journal is functional, stylish and great for recording your habits. It's designed to help you stay organized so you feel empowered while finding balance, focus and peace so you can achieve your goals and mission.


The daily mood tracker journal has a beautiful colored interior and various sections that you can fill out documenting your habits.


Get an insight into you daily habits, moods, and emotions with the daily mood tracker. Improve your mental health, peace of mind, manage your stress and reduce anxiety.


Sometimes our days can be overwhelming with so much to do or get done so we can stay productive and fruitful. A daily planner journal helps to improve your effectiveness, efficiency and ability to produce great results.


If you are not using the journal for yourself, you can give it as a gift to a loved one, friend, family member, colleague, co-worker, charity organization etc and bless someone else and help them stay organized and in control of their life and things.


The journal is ideal for both men and women and can be used by adults of all ages. It can be used for both personal or business purposes.


Inside:

  • Date:

  • Time:

  • Mood:

  • Notes


An Inside page with a list of common moods and emotions.


  • Admiration

  • Adoration

  • Aesthetic

  • Amusement

  • Anger

  • Annoyed

  • Anticipation

  • Anxious

  • Appreciation

  • Aversion

  • Awe

  • Awkwardness

  • Bitter

  • Boredom

  • Calmness

  • Cheated

  • Compassion

  • Confused

  • Contentment

  • Contrary

  • Craving

  • Desperate

  • Disappointed

  • Disapproving

  • Disgust

  • Dislike

  • Disturbed

  • Doubtful

  • Empathetic

  • Enjoyment

  • Entrancement

  • Envy

  • Excitement

  • Fear

  • Friendship

  • Frustrated

  • Gloomy

  • Grieved

  • Happiness

  • Heartbroken

  • Hopeless

  • Horrified

  • Indignation

  • Infuriated

  • Insulted

  • Interest

  • Irritated

  • Joy

  • Kindness

  • Loathing

  • Lonely

  • Lost

  • Love

  • Mad

  • Miserable

  • Nauseated

  • Nervous

  • Nostalgia

  • Offended

  • Pain

  • Panicked

  • Peace

  • Peeved

  • Pity

  • Pride

  • Relief

  • Resigned

  • Revulsion

  • Romance

  • Sadness

  • Satisfaction

  • Sexual Desire

  • Shame

  • Stressed

  • Surprise

  • Terrified

  • Troubled

  • Trust

  • Uncomfortable

  • Unhappy

  • Vengeful

  • Withdrawn

  • Worried



Wikipedia:


Mood (psychology)


In psychology, a mood is an affective state. In contrast to emotions or feelings, moods are less specific, less intense and less likely to be provoked or instantiated by a particular stimulus or event. Moods are typically described as having either a positive or negative valence. In other words, people usually talk about being in a good mood or a bad mood.

Mood also differs from temperament or personality traits which are even longer-lasting. Nevertheless, personality traits such as optimism and neuroticism predispose certain types of moods. Long term disturbances of mood such as clinical depression and bipolar disorder are considered mood disorders. Mood is an internal, subjective state but it often can be inferred from posture and other behaviors. "We can be sent into a mood by an unexpected event, from the happiness of seeing an old friend to the anger of discovering betrayal by a partner. We may also just fall into a mood."

Research also shows that a person's mood can influence how they process advertising. Mood has been found to interact with gender to affect consumer processing of information.



Emotion


Emotions are biological states associated with the nervous system[1][2][3] brought on by neurophysiological changes variously associated with thoughts, feelings, behavioural responses, and a degree of pleasure or displeasure.[4][5] There is currently no scientific consensus on a definition. Emotions are often intertwined with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, creativity,[6] and motivation.[7]

Research on emotion has increased significantly over the past two decades with many fields contributing including psychology, neuroscience, affective neuroscience, endocrinology, medicine, history, sociology of emotions, and computer science. The numerous theories that attempt to explain the origin, neurobiology, experience, and function of emotions have only fostered more intense research on this topic. Current areas of research in the concept of emotion include the development of materials that stimulate and elicit emotion. In addition, PET scans and fMRI scans help study the affective picture processes in the brain.




Emotion classification


Emotion classification, the means by which one may distinguish or contrast one emotion from another, is a contested issue in emotion research and in affective science. Researchers have approached the classification of emotions from one of two fundamental viewpoints:

  1. that emotions are discrete and fundamentally different constructs

  2. that emotions can be characterized on a dimensional basis in groupings


Mood Tracking


Mood tracking is a positive psychology technique for improving mental health where a person records their mood, usually at set time intervals, in order to help identify patterns in how their mood varies. It has been suggested as a self-help method for people suffering from mood disorders such as anxiety, clinical depression, and bipolar disorder.




Mood Swing


A mood swing is an extreme or rapid change in mood. Such mood swings can play a positive part in promoting problem solving and in producing flexible forward planning. However, when mood swings are so strong that they are disruptive, they may be the main part of a bipolar disorder.



Metamood


Meta-mood is a term used by psychologists to refer to an individual's awareness of their emotions.[1] The term was first utilized by John D. Mayer and Peter Salovey who believed the experience of mood involved "direct" and "indirect" components.[2] While the direct level refers to the simple appearance of mood - happiness, fear, anger, sadness, and surprise (often referred to as the six basic emotions, introduced by Paul Ekman),[3] the indirect level, or the meta-mood experience, does not solely consist of the emotions experienced by an individual in the moment. Rather, it is a reflective state which involves additional thoughts and feelings about the mood itself.[2] "I shouldn’t feel this way" or "I am thinking of ways to improve my mood" are examples of reflective thoughts during a meta-mood experience.[4]

Meta-mood is also a facet of emotional intelligence. Alexithymia, or the inability to identify and describe one's own or others' emotions, is generally viewed as antagonistic to meta-mood, as individuals who have symptoms of alexithymia often have trouble describing and analyzing their emotions. People who are unreflective and emotionally stable have fewer meta-mood experiences and commonly do not need them.[3] On the other hand, individuals who are generally self-aware and have high emotionality have highly developed meta-mood experiences. Studies have shown that individuals who are able to improve negative moods through meta-emotions are seen to possess healthier personalities than individuals who are not able to have such experiences.[3]



Journal Therapy


Journal therapy is a writing therapy focusing on the writer's internal experiences, thoughts and feelings. This kind of therapy uses reflective writing enabling the writer to gain mental and emotional clarity, validate experiences and come to a deeper understanding of him/herself. Journal therapy can also be used to express difficult material or access previously inaccessible materials.

Like other forms of therapy, journal therapy can be used to heal a writer's emotional or physical problems or work through a trauma, such as an illness, addiction, or relationship problems, among others.[1] Journal therapy can supplement an on-going therapy, or can take place in group therapy or self-directed therapy.



Quantified Self


The quantified self refers both to the cultural phenomenon of self-tracking with technology and to a community of users and makers of self-tracking tools who share an interest in “self-knowledge through numbers.”[1] Quantified Self practices overlap with the practice of lifelogging and other trends that incorporate technology and data acquisition into daily life, often with the goal of improving physical, mental, and/or emotional performance. The widespread adoption in recent years of wearable fitness and sleep trackers such as the Fitbit or the Apple Watch[2], combined with the increased presence of Internet of Things in healthcare and in exercise equipment, have made self-tracking accessible to a large segment of the population.



Depression (Mood)


Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity.[1] It can affect a person's thoughts, behavior, motivation, feelings, and sense of well-being. [2] The core symptom of depression is said to be anhedonia, which refers to loss of interest or a loss of feeling of pleasure in certain activities that usually bring joy to people.[3] Depressed mood is a symptom of some mood disorders such as major depressive disorder or dysthymia;[4] it is a normal temporary reaction to life events, such as the loss of a loved one; and it is also a symptom of some physical diseases and a side effect of some drugs and medical treatments.

Details

Description:


  • Page size: 8.5 inches wide x 11 inches long

  • File type: I pdf book

  • Page number: 104 pages.

Your instant digital downloadable file will become available for you to download once your purchase has been confirmed.


Sorry, we don't accept cancellations, exchanges and returns because this is a digital download file. All sales are considered final and non-refundable because of the nature of the file.

Since it's a digital file, nothing will be shipped to you. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us before purchase.


This printable file can be printed and put together based on your needs and wants. You buy it once but you can print the pages as many times you like.


You can print the file at home, work, printer shop, retail store, UPS, Walmart, Costo-co, Online printer, Walgreens, CVS, Canva etc.

The files are high resolution and of great quality.


Sometimes the color of the final print out can vary and differ from monitor to monitor and printer to printer. So please keep in mind that final print quality depends on the type of printer, computer and paper used for printing.


For the best results, please use a great printer and choose high quality paper.


Write in your daily mood tracker everyday to develop a consistency so that you can understand your habits and have better insights into your patterns.


The daily mood tracker journal is functional, stylish and great for recording your habits. It's designed to help you stay organized so you feel empowered while finding balance, focus and peace so you can achieve your goals and mission.


The daily mood tracker journal has a beautiful colored interior and various sections that you can fill out documenting your habits.


Get an insight into you daily habits, moods, and emotions with the daily mood tracker. Improve your mental health, peace of mind, manage your stress and reduce anxiety.


Sometimes our days can be overwhelming with so much to do or get done so we can stay productive and fruitful. A daily planner journal helps to improve your effectiveness, efficiency and ability to produce great results.


If you are not using the journal for yourself, you can give it as a gift to a loved one, friend, family member, colleague, co-worker, charity organization etc and bless someone else and help them stay organized and in control of their life and things.


The journal is ideal for both men and women and can be used by adults of all ages. It can be used for both personal or business purposes.


Inside:

  • Date:

  • Time:

  • Mood:

  • Notes


An Inside page with a list of common moods and emotions.


  • Admiration

  • Adoration

  • Aesthetic

  • Amusement

  • Anger

  • Annoyed

  • Anticipation

  • Anxious

  • Appreciation

  • Aversion

  • Awe

  • Awkwardness

  • Bitter

  • Boredom

  • Calmness

  • Cheated

  • Compassion

  • Confused

  • Contentment

  • Contrary

  • Craving

  • Desperate

  • Disappointed

  • Disapproving

  • Disgust

  • Dislike

  • Disturbed

  • Doubtful

  • Empathetic

  • Enjoyment

  • Entrancement

  • Envy

  • Excitement

  • Fear

  • Friendship

  • Frustrated

  • Gloomy

  • Grieved

  • Happiness

  • Heartbroken

  • Hopeless

  • Horrified

  • Indignation

  • Infuriated

  • Insulted

  • Interest

  • Irritated

  • Joy

  • Kindness

  • Loathing

  • Lonely

  • Lost

  • Love

  • Mad

  • Miserable

  • Nauseated

  • Nervous

  • Nostalgia

  • Offended

  • Pain

  • Panicked

  • Peace

  • Peeved

  • Pity

  • Pride

  • Relief

  • Resigned

  • Revulsion

  • Romance

  • Sadness

  • Satisfaction

  • Sexual Desire

  • Shame

  • Stressed

  • Surprise

  • Terrified

  • Troubled

  • Trust

  • Uncomfortable

  • Unhappy

  • Vengeful

  • Withdrawn

  • Worried



Wikipedia:


Mood (psychology)


In psychology, a mood is an affective state. In contrast to emotions or feelings, moods are less specific, less intense and less likely to be provoked or instantiated by a particular stimulus or event. Moods are typically described as having either a positive or negative valence. In other words, people usually talk about being in a good mood or a bad mood.

Mood also differs from temperament or personality traits which are even longer-lasting. Nevertheless, personality traits such as optimism and neuroticism predispose certain types of moods. Long term disturbances of mood such as clinical depression and bipolar disorder are considered mood disorders. Mood is an internal, subjective state but it often can be inferred from posture and other behaviors. "We can be sent into a mood by an unexpected event, from the happiness of seeing an old friend to the anger of discovering betrayal by a partner. We may also just fall into a mood."

Research also shows that a person's mood can influence how they process advertising. Mood has been found to interact with gender to affect consumer processing of information.



Emotion


Emotions are biological states associated with the nervous system[1][2][3] brought on by neurophysiological changes variously associated with thoughts, feelings, behavioural responses, and a degree of pleasure or displeasure.[4][5] There is currently no scientific consensus on a definition. Emotions are often intertwined with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, creativity,[6] and motivation.[7]

Research on emotion has increased significantly over the past two decades with many fields contributing including psychology, neuroscience, affective neuroscience, endocrinology, medicine, history, sociology of emotions, and computer science. The numerous theories that attempt to explain the origin, neurobiology, experience, and function of emotions have only fostered more intense research on this topic. Current areas of research in the concept of emotion include the development of materials that stimulate and elicit emotion. In addition, PET scans and fMRI scans help study the affective picture processes in the brain.




Emotion classification


Emotion classification, the means by which one may distinguish or contrast one emotion from another, is a contested issue in emotion research and in affective science. Researchers have approached the classification of emotions from one of two fundamental viewpoints:

  1. that emotions are discrete and fundamentally different constructs

  2. that emotions can be characterized on a dimensional basis in groupings


Mood Tracking


Mood tracking is a positive psychology technique for improving mental health where a person records their mood, usually at set time intervals, in order to help identify patterns in how their mood varies. It has been suggested as a self-help method for people suffering from mood disorders such as anxiety, clinical depression, and bipolar disorder.




Mood Swing


A mood swing is an extreme or rapid change in mood. Such mood swings can play a positive part in promoting problem solving and in producing flexible forward planning. However, when mood swings are so strong that they are disruptive, they may be the main part of a bipolar disorder.



Metamood


Meta-mood is a term used by psychologists to refer to an individual's awareness of their emotions.[1] The term was first utilized by John D. Mayer and Peter Salovey who believed the experience of mood involved "direct" and "indirect" components.[2] While the direct level refers to the simple appearance of mood - happiness, fear, anger, sadness, and surprise (often referred to as the six basic emotions, introduced by Paul Ekman),[3] the indirect level, or the meta-mood experience, does not solely consist of the emotions experienced by an individual in the moment. Rather, it is a reflective state which involves additional thoughts and feelings about the mood itself.[2] "I shouldn’t feel this way" or "I am thinking of ways to improve my mood" are examples of reflective thoughts during a meta-mood experience.[4]

Meta-mood is also a facet of emotional intelligence. Alexithymia, or the inability to identify and describe one's own or others' emotions, is generally viewed as antagonistic to meta-mood, as individuals who have symptoms of alexithymia often have trouble describing and analyzing their emotions. People who are unreflective and emotionally stable have fewer meta-mood experiences and commonly do not need them.[3] On the other hand, individuals who are generally self-aware and have high emotionality have highly developed meta-mood experiences. Studies have shown that individuals who are able to improve negative moods through meta-emotions are seen to possess healthier personalities than individuals who are not able to have such experiences.[3]



Journal Therapy


Journal therapy is a writing therapy focusing on the writer's internal experiences, thoughts and feelings. This kind of therapy uses reflective writing enabling the writer to gain mental and emotional clarity, validate experiences and come to a deeper understanding of him/herself. Journal therapy can also be used to express difficult material or access previously inaccessible materials.

Like other forms of therapy, journal therapy can be used to heal a writer's emotional or physical problems or work through a trauma, such as an illness, addiction, or relationship problems, among others.[1] Journal therapy can supplement an on-going therapy, or can take place in group therapy or self-directed therapy.



Quantified Self


The quantified self refers both to the cultural phenomenon of self-tracking with technology and to a community of users and makers of self-tracking tools who share an interest in “self-knowledge through numbers.”[1] Quantified Self practices overlap with the practice of lifelogging and other trends that incorporate technology and data acquisition into daily life, often with the goal of improving physical, mental, and/or emotional performance. The widespread adoption in recent years of wearable fitness and sleep trackers such as the Fitbit or the Apple Watch[2], combined with the increased presence of Internet of Things in healthcare and in exercise equipment, have made self-tracking accessible to a large segment of the population.



Depression (Mood)


Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity.[1] It can affect a person's thoughts, behavior, motivation, feelings, and sense of well-being. [2] The core symptom of depression is said to be anhedonia, which refers to loss of interest or a loss of feeling of pleasure in certain activities that usually bring joy to people.[3] Depressed mood is a symptom of some mood disorders such as major depressive disorder or dysthymia;[4] it is a normal temporary reaction to life events, such as the loss of a loved one; and it is also a symptom of some physical diseases and a side effect of some drugs and medical treatments.

Details

Description:


  • Page size: 8.5 inches wide x 11 inches long

  • File type: I pdf book

  • Page number: 104 pages.

Your instant digital downloadable file will become available for you to download once your purchase has been confirmed.


Sorry, we don't accept cancellations, exchanges and returns because this is a digital download file. All sales are considered final and non-refundable because of the nature of the file.

Since it's a digital file, nothing will be shipped to you. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us before purchase.


This printable file can be printed and put together based on your needs and wants. You buy it once but you can print the pages as many times you like.


You can print the file at home, work, printer shop, retail store, UPS, Walmart, Costo-co, Online printer, Walgreens, CVS, Canva etc.

The files are high resolution and of great quality.


Sometimes the color of the final print out can vary and differ from monitor to monitor and printer to printer. So please keep in mind that final print quality depends on the type of printer, computer and paper used for printing.


For the best results, please use a great printer and choose high quality paper.


Write in your daily mood tracker everyday to develop a consistency so that you can understand your habits and have better insights into your patterns.


The daily mood tracker journal is functional, stylish and great for recording your habits. It's designed to help you stay organized so you feel empowered while finding balance, focus and peace so you can achieve your goals and mission.


The daily mood tracker journal has a beautiful colored interior and various sections that you can fill out documenting your habits.


Get an insight into you daily habits, moods, and emotions with the daily mood tracker. Improve your mental health, peace of mind, manage your stress and reduce anxiety.


Sometimes our days can be overwhelming with so much to do or get done so we can stay productive and fruitful. A daily planner journal helps to improve your effectiveness, efficiency and ability to produce great results.


If you are not using the journal for yourself, you can give it as a gift to a loved one, friend, family member, colleague, co-worker, charity organization etc and bless someone else and help them stay organized and in control of their life and things.


The journal is ideal for both men and women and can be used by adults of all ages. It can be used for both personal or business purposes.


Inside:

  • Date:

  • Time:

  • Mood:

  • Notes


An Inside page with a list of common moods and emotions.


  • Admiration

  • Adoration

  • Aesthetic

  • Amusement

  • Anger

  • Annoyed

  • Anticipation

  • Anxious

  • Appreciation

  • Aversion

  • Awe

  • Awkwardness

  • Bitter

  • Boredom

  • Calmness

  • Cheated

  • Compassion

  • Confused

  • Contentment

  • Contrary

  • Craving

  • Desperate

  • Disappointed

  • Disapproving

  • Disgust

  • Dislike

  • Disturbed

  • Doubtful

  • Empathetic

  • Enjoyment

  • Entrancement

  • Envy

  • Excitement

  • Fear

  • Friendship

  • Frustrated

  • Gloomy

  • Grieved

  • Happiness

  • Heartbroken

  • Hopeless

  • Horrified

  • Indignation

  • Infuriated

  • Insulted

  • Interest

  • Irritated

  • Joy

  • Kindness

  • Loathing

  • Lonely

  • Lost

  • Love

  • Mad

  • Miserable

  • Nauseated

  • Nervous

  • Nostalgia

  • Offended

  • Pain

  • Panicked

  • Peace

  • Peeved

  • Pity

  • Pride

  • Relief

  • Resigned

  • Revulsion

  • Romance

  • Sadness

  • Satisfaction

  • Sexual Desire

  • Shame

  • Stressed

  • Surprise

  • Terrified

  • Troubled

  • Trust

  • Uncomfortable

  • Unhappy

  • Vengeful

  • Withdrawn

  • Worried



Wikipedia:


Mood (psychology)


In psychology, a mood is an affective state. In contrast to emotions or feelings, moods are less specific, less intense and less likely to be provoked or instantiated by a particular stimulus or event. Moods are typically described as having either a positive or negative valence. In other words, people usually talk about being in a good mood or a bad mood.

Mood also differs from temperament or personality traits which are even longer-lasting. Nevertheless, personality traits such as optimism and neuroticism predispose certain types of moods. Long term disturbances of mood such as clinical depression and bipolar disorder are considered mood disorders. Mood is an internal, subjective state but it often can be inferred from posture and other behaviors. "We can be sent into a mood by an unexpected event, from the happiness of seeing an old friend to the anger of discovering betrayal by a partner. We may also just fall into a mood."

Research also shows that a person's mood can influence how they process advertising. Mood has been found to interact with gender to affect consumer processing of information.



Emotion


Emotions are biological states associated with the nervous system[1][2][3] brought on by neurophysiological changes variously associated with thoughts, feelings, behavioural responses, and a degree of pleasure or displeasure.[4][5] There is currently no scientific consensus on a definition. Emotions are often intertwined with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, creativity,[6] and motivation.[7]

Research on emotion has increased significantly over the past two decades with many fields contributing including psychology, neuroscience, affective neuroscience, endocrinology, medicine, history, sociology of emotions, and computer science. The numerous theories that attempt to explain the origin, neurobiology, experience, and function of emotions have only fostered more intense research on this topic. Current areas of research in the concept of emotion include the development of materials that stimulate and elicit emotion. In addition, PET scans and fMRI scans help study the affective picture processes in the brain.




Emotion classification


Emotion classification, the means by which one may distinguish or contrast one emotion from another, is a contested issue in emotion research and in affective science. Researchers have approached the classification of emotions from one of two fundamental viewpoints:

  1. that emotions are discrete and fundamentally different constructs

  2. that emotions can be characterized on a dimensional basis in groupings


Mood Tracking


Mood tracking is a positive psychology technique for improving mental health where a person records their mood, usually at set time intervals, in order to help identify patterns in how their mood varies. It has been suggested as a self-help method for people suffering from mood disorders such as anxiety, clinical depression, and bipolar disorder.




Mood Swing


A mood swing is an extreme or rapid change in mood. Such mood swings can play a positive part in promoting problem solving and in producing flexible forward planning. However, when mood swings are so strong that they are disruptive, they may be the main part of a bipolar disorder.



Metamood


Meta-mood is a term used by psychologists to refer to an individual's awareness of their emotions.[1] The term was first utilized by John D. Mayer and Peter Salovey who believed the experience of mood involved "direct" and "indirect" components.[2] While the direct level refers to the simple appearance of mood - happiness, fear, anger, sadness, and surprise (often referred to as the six basic emotions, introduced by Paul Ekman),[3] the indirect level, or the meta-mood experience, does not solely consist of the emotions experienced by an individual in the moment. Rather, it is a reflective state which involves additional thoughts and feelings about the mood itself.[2] "I shouldn’t feel this way" or "I am thinking of ways to improve my mood" are examples of reflective thoughts during a meta-mood experience.[4]

Meta-mood is also a facet of emotional intelligence. Alexithymia, or the inability to identify and describe one's own or others' emotions, is generally viewed as antagonistic to meta-mood, as individuals who have symptoms of alexithymia often have trouble describing and analyzing their emotions. People who are unreflective and emotionally stable have fewer meta-mood experiences and commonly do not need them.[3] On the other hand, individuals who are generally self-aware and have high emotionality have highly developed meta-mood experiences. Studies have shown that individuals who are able to improve negative moods through meta-emotions are seen to possess healthier personalities than individuals who are not able to have such experiences.[3]



Journal Therapy


Journal therapy is a writing therapy focusing on the writer's internal experiences, thoughts and feelings. This kind of therapy uses reflective writing enabling the writer to gain mental and emotional clarity, validate experiences and come to a deeper understanding of him/herself. Journal therapy can also be used to express difficult material or access previously inaccessible materials.

Like other forms of therapy, journal therapy can be used to heal a writer's emotional or physical problems or work through a trauma, such as an illness, addiction, or relationship problems, among others.[1] Journal therapy can supplement an on-going therapy, or can take place in group therapy or self-directed therapy.



Quantified Self


The quantified self refers both to the cultural phenomenon of self-tracking with technology and to a community of users and makers of self-tracking tools who share an interest in “self-knowledge through numbers.”[1] Quantified Self practices overlap with the practice of lifelogging and other trends that incorporate technology and data acquisition into daily life, often with the goal of improving physical, mental, and/or emotional performance. The widespread adoption in recent years of wearable fitness and sleep trackers such as the Fitbit or the Apple Watch[2], combined with the increased presence of Internet of Things in healthcare and in exercise equipment, have made self-tracking accessible to a large segment of the population.



Depression (Mood)


Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity.[1] It can affect a person's thoughts, behavior, motivation, feelings, and sense of well-being. [2] The core symptom of depression is said to be anhedonia, which refers to loss of interest or a loss of feeling of pleasure in certain activities that usually bring joy to people.[3] Depressed mood is a symptom of some mood disorders such as major depressive disorder or dysthymia;[4] it is a normal temporary reaction to life events, such as the loss of a loved one; and it is also a symptom of some physical diseases and a side effect of some drugs and medical treatments.

Title
Calm Your Mind - Daily Mood Tracker Journal Rustic Green Wood
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Calm Your Mind - Daily Mood Tracker Journal Scandinavian Green Nordic
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